Apa Itu Stereologi? Dalam 3 Menit, Anda Akan Paham Mengapa Anda Perlu Belajar Stereologi

Video ini berisi penjelasan singkat mengenai stereologi. Dalam video 3 menit ini, Anda akan memahami pentingnya mempelajari stereologi bagi para peneliti yang ingin melakukan kuantifikasi struktur 3 dimensi dari potongan 2 dimensi.

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This video gives a brief description of stereology. After watching this 3 minute video, you will understand the importance of studying stereology for researchers who want to do quantitation of 3 dimensional structures from 2 dimensional sections.

Konsep Dasar Stereologi | Basic Concepts of Stereology

Dalam video ini, dr. Ginus Partadiredja, MSc, PhD memaparkan konsep-konsep dasar stereologi dan alasan pentingnya penggunaan stereologi dalam penelitian-penelitian biomedis terutama histologi kuantitatif.

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In this video, dr. Ginus Partadiredja, MSc, PhD describes the basic concepts of stereology and the importance of using stereology in biomedical studies, especially quantitative histology.

Approaches to Quantitative Histomorphometry

Approaches to Quantitative Histomorphometry

Quantitative histomorphometry refers to a set of methods used to extract quantitative knowledge from stained, histological tissue sections. The goal is often to obtain data about cell numbers, volume of tissue compartments. This could be a result of a treatment, to assess the state of a disease, or to gain new anatomical knowledge. The available methods fall into two main categories: image analysis and stereology.

In this presentation, the fundamental differences between the methods will be explained and illustrated with examples. Advantages and limitations of image analysis and stereology will be compared and the question about when to apply which method will be addressed. Sometimes the best approach can be a combination of image analysis and stereology and there will be examples of how the Visiopharm software for image analysis takes advantage of stereological principles and vice versa.

Stereological Estimation of the Number of Cardiac Myocytes – Challenges and Sollutions

Stereological Estimation of the Number of Cardiac Myocytes – Challenges and Sollutions

Heart muscle fibres are elongated muscle cells con¬nected to each other end-to-end through highly specialised regions named the intercalated discs. Cardiac myocytes can have one or more nuclei, which normally are located in the central region of the myocyte. The number of myocyte nuclei depends on species. This means that the number of nuclei is not the same as the number of myocytes!

Because of the above factors, it is not possible to count the total number of cardiac myocytes directly in ordinary histological sections. The reason is that it is difficult to identify the intercalated discs and, also at times, to identify the lateral borders of the myocytes. A method is presented that uses antibodies to define the boundaries of the myocytes, thereby, allowing to estimate the mean number of nuclei per myocyte in local vertical windows from thin serial sections.

A short demonstration of this method, where 16 serial sections are aligned using Tissuealign™, is presented.

Furthermore, main results from the application of the method in growth hormone treated rat hearts are presented.

Prof. C. Muhlfield: State-of-the-art stereology in cardiac research

Prof. C. Muhlfield: State-of-the-art stereology in cardiac research

Biomedical research strongly relies on quantitative information. In microscopy, stereological methods provide a solid and unbiased basis to obtain quantitative data about three-dimensional features of tissues, cells or organelles from two-dimensional physical or optical sections. A large number of unbiased stereological methods offer an efficient quantitative approach to important questions in cardiac research, such as: Is the transition from ventricular hypertrophy to heart failure accompanied by a significant loss of cardiomyocytes? Or: What is the exact cardiac phenotype of a specific gene-manipulated mouse? Or: Does a certain disease lead to changes in the cardiac innervation? However, the use of stereological methods in cardiac research could be increased. The present webinar shows how some of the potential pitfalls in quantitative microscopy may be avoided. It will outline the concepts of unbiased stereology and illustrate their practical applications to a wide range of biological questions in cardiac research.

Dr. K-A Dorph-Petersen: Tissue Deformation and Modern Stereology

Dr. K-A Dorph-Petersen: Tissue Deformation and Modern Stereology

The webinar covers the issue of tissue deformation in a context of design based stereological studies. Most histological procedures cause dimensional changes of the tissue samples-typically shrinkage-which directly or indirectly easily may bias an otherwise unbiased stereological design. The importance of detecting shrinkage when present will be discussed and practical example of how to do so in the lab will be presented. The webinar will also discuss tissue shrinkage in relation to the main stereological estimates with a focus on number and volume estimation. In particular, uneven shrinkage in the thickness of the sections, which typically is very prominent in cryo and vibratome sections, will bias the original optical fractionator leading to biased number estimates. However, a solution to this problem will be discussed in details.

Dr. D.L. Brown: Proportionator Sampling

Dr. D.L. Brown: Proportionator Sampling

Historically, estimating total cell number within a tissue or structure by stereological methods has been accomplished through systematic uniform random sampling, namely the simple Fractionator design. This sampling paradigm is often inefficient, particularly when examining heterogeneous cell populations. In a regulatory setting, efficiency is of utmost importance. Proportionator sampling is a novel method which utilizes an image analysis configuration to guide sampling. This decreases the number of sampling fields that do not contain cells of interest and highly increases sampling efficiency. Using the Visiopharm software platform, we applied Proportionator sampling to estimate dopaminergic neuron number in the substantia nigra of a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease and compared the labor time to that of Fractionator sampling. Proportionator sampling decreased labor time 3-fold when compared with Fractionator sampling and produced data with lower coefficient of error estimates.

Prof. M. Ochs: Design-Based Lung Stereology

The Basic Principles of Design-based Lung Stereology

The Webinar is intended to provide an introduction to the basic principles of design-based stereology with emphasis on its practical application to the lung. Topics to be covered include experimental design, specimen preparation, sampling techniques, use of stereological probes, and estimation of stereological parameters. Examples of applications to animal models of lung disease will be given. The principles and recommendations follow the recently established ‘standards for quantitative assessment of lung structure’, developed by a task force of the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society, which will be published as an official ATS/ERS research policy statement.

Prof. M. Ochs: Assessing Lung Structure by Stereology Part 2

Prof. Matthias Ochs: Assessing lung structure by stereology. Part II: What and when? – Applications

This presentation is intended to provide an introduction to the basic principles of design-based stereology with emphasis on its practical application to the lung in the context of experimental studies. Topics include experimental design, specimen preparation, sampling techniques, use of stereological probes, and estimation of stereological parameters for characterizing structural alterations in the lung. The principles and recommendations follow the ‘standards for quantitative assessment of lung structure’, developed by a task force of the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society, which have been published as an official ATS/ERS research policy statement (Hsia CCW, Hyde DM, Ochs M, Weibel ER. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2010:181:394-418).

The topic is divided into two webinars. A first one covering the introduction and basic principles of stereology was given in January 2012. This second webinar will focus on examples of applications to animal models of lung disease (acute lung injury, fibrosis, emphysema) and practical aspects such as equipment.